7 Tips for Taking a Vacation with a Teenager with Autism

7 Tips for Taking a Vacation with a Teenager with Autism

7 Tips for Taking a Vacation with a Teenager with Autism

*This post contains affiliate links. There is no extra cost to you, but will greatly help our family. Please see our disclosure for further information.

7 tips for taking a vacation with a teenager with autism

This past weekend I was able to go on a little vacation to Kansas City with my brother, mom, and husband. We left Thursday evening and were able to come back Sunday afternoon. This was a nice little get away for our family to spend some quality time together. As a family, we have learned over the years some tips and strategies to help my brother have success and fun while on vacation. As many of you know, a new experience can be difficult for a child or teenager with autism to handle.

Here are some tricks that we have learned over the years to help create a fun and safe experience for my brother while on vacation.

  1. Always learn to be patient. I feel this is key in all areas of our lives, but it still stays true on a vacation. When going on a vacation, we get out of our normal every day routine and there are going to be unexpected events. This can be difficult for my brother to handle when he doesn’t know what could happen next. We always try to be patient in every new situation to give my brother time to process each situation.
  2. Pack food we know he likes. My brother is still a picky eater, but he has gotten so much better at the willingness to try more foods. It is very difficult for us to go to a restaurant together and sit down to have a meal even today. My mom does a wonderful job of packing foods and snacks that she knows he will like so that when we get to the hotel we don’t have to go and find a grocery store or a specific fast food restaurant that he will only eat at.
  3. Do your research before you go and find activities you know your child will enjoy. I know this one may seem a little obvious, but do some research before you go to make sure there is a special activity that your child/teenager will really look forward to when you go.     We want to make sure the trip will be exciting and fun for everyone! For our trip this weekend, my brother was super excited to go to Dave and Buster’s! He had never been to one before and was so excited to go! He was the one that actually did the research beforehand and found out we were staying close by. He did his own research and sought out an activity that he knew he really wanted to do. In fact, we went two days 🙂
  4. Let your teenager have some choices and say in what they want to do. My mom has always been great at this, she does her best to make sure we can all try to do something we want to do on the trip. She gives my brother choices every day of the trip to let my brother do what he wants to do. If we are trying to do something as a family where he doesn’t have a choice, then we just tell him we are going to go do this and it will be so much fun! Let’s go! In some instances, during the day he doesn’t always have a choice, but when he can we make sure to give him a choice so he can choose what he wants to do.
  5. Make sure you have some down time to rest. A vacation is usually fast paced and exciting, but our family always makes sure we make time to rest back at the hotel. My brother loves just having downtime to play on his iPad or to get on his computer. We make sure he has this during his day to help regulate his sensory system. Make sure you don’t forget what types of activities help to regulate your child while on vacation.Make sure you find ways to incorporate that throughout your vacation to allow your child to be their best!
  6. Try to keep to a typical sleeping routine. My mom and brother are night owls, and I am not one any longer 🙁 Now, with my work schedule I usually try to go to bed earlier. I know that my mom does her best to try to keep my brother on his regular sleeping schedule to help him have enough energy to enjoy the next day’s activities.
  7. We always try to pack some extra clothes, activities, and a pillow. Our family is one of those families that always brings too much, but we have learned that sometimes it is better to have too much than not the right stuff for your child. My mom does a great job of packing some extra clothes or outfits for my brother incase something were to happen and he wouldn’t like an outfit one day or it got dirty. She also does a great job of packing activities she know he likes. For example she packed some of his favorite things right now to help with the drive and waiting times in the hotel. She packed his fidget spinner, headphones, iPad, and putty. She also does a great job of bringing an extra pillow so that he will have something we know he likes when he goes to sleep. Not every hotel has great pillows and beds, but at least this way we know he has a pillow he likes.

Do you have any tips and strategies that have worked well for your family when you go on a vacation with your child or teenager? We would love to hear your tips in the comments below! We can always learn more to best be able to help my brother!

Voices of Special Needs Blog Hop

Welcome to Voices of Special Needs Blog Hop — a monthly gathering of posts from special needs bloggers hosted by The Sensory Spectrum and The Jenny Evolution. Click on the links below to read stories from other bloggers about having a special needs kiddo — from Sensory Processing Disorder to ADHD, from Autism to Dyslexia! Want to join in on next month’s Voices of Special Needs Hop? Click here!

 

 Loading InLinkz ...
31 Sensory Strategies with Dressing for Children with Autism

31 Sensory Strategies with Dressing for Children with Autism

31 Sensory Strategies for Dressing for Children with Autism

*This post contains affiliate links. There is no extra cost to you, but will greatly help our family. Please read our disclosure for further information.

Sensory Strategies to Improve Independence with Dressing

Every person has different sensory preferences in our everyday lives. Some of us like a very calm environment, warm baths, listening to music, soft textures, or to eat sweet foods. We even have sensory preferences when it comes to dressing. I know I enjoy wearing yoga pants and a loose fitting shirt over dress pants and a dress shirt. My brother also prefers to wear clothes that are soft and loose fitting. As a family, we know that getting dressed every day can be a big chore and we want to help you find sensory strategies to help make the every day task of getting dressed easier for your child/teenager with Autism easier for every one.

Here are some sensory strategies we have found helpful with my brother when it comes to clothing textures:

There are various clothing textures that can bother children when it comes to dressing.

Seams in clothes, some children dislike the feeling of seams

Try finding clothes that are seamless

Clothing tags

Texture of the clothes (cotton, wool, or spandex) 

  • Figure out what types of textures of clothes your child likes and stick with that so that they can feel safe and become less anxious with dressing.
Binding in the clothes (elastic waist bands, overlapping clothes)
  • Try finding clothes that will not bind or wrinkle
Loose Clothes or Tight Clothes
Stiff Clothing (like jeans)
  • Some children have a very hard time being able to wear jeans. Try to find pants that they enjoy wearing. If they need to wear jeans for an occasion then try to find jeans with a soft/stretchy texture.
  • You could try these stretchy elastic waist jeans 

Some children can be bothered by clothing that could touch the child’s head. Be aware of this with your child and notice if hats really bother them.

Shoes can be something that your child might have a hard time with. Some kids prefer closed toes shoes or open toe shoes. Try to find shoes that allow your child to be independent with dressing. If they become frustrated with tying their shoes try elastic shoe laces or velcro shoes. Maybe your child would like light up shoes for fun! Try to find shoes that are comfortable for your child that they can be successful with in dressing.

Weight of the clothing (heavy clothes vs. light clothes). Pay attention to the time of year is your child more bothered by heavy winter clothes or light summer clothes? Is there a way you can take away layers or add layers in textures of clothes that your child still prefers?

When children are bothered by the feeling of their clothes they may constantly tag or pull at their clothes. They may have difficulty needing to change clothes through out the day such as for swimming lessons or after getting dirty. If you child does become bothered by changing clothes, try to limit the number of times they will need to change their clothes. Also shopping for new clothes may cause a lot of stress. See if you can do more shopping online where they have free returns so you don’t have to cause too much stress for your family.

Children can also have visual and auditory preferences with clothing and this is something to consider.

  • Visual preferences in the clothing
    Some children prefer a certain color, numbers or letters, or character on their clothes. Find out if there is a certain thing that your child prefers and figure out if they would be more willing to be more independent with dressing with that preferred item of clothing. For example, a child might love the Ninja Turtles, find some Ninja Turtles clothes that they could wear every day to help them be more independent with dressing.

    Finding clothes in their closet or drawer maybe difficult or cause them stress

    • Set them up for success with either having the clothes laid out for them or in a location in their room where they can easily access the clothes to put them on every day.
  • Auditory
    • Clothing noises (e.g. buckles, sequins or sparkles)
      • Some children can become very bothered by the different sounds clothing can make such as buckles rubbing together or sequins/sparkles on a shirt rubbing together. If that is bothersome for your child, try to avoid those types of clothing.
    • Sounds of items in their pocket of their pants

If your child becomes very irritated by the clothing texture, see if you can find textures of clothes that they are more comfortable in. Don’t force them to wear clothes that they really dislike wearing.

If you find a certain texture of clothing that your child/teenager is more likely to wear such as a loose fitting shirt that is cotton, when they need to find clothes for a different occasion such as a wedding, try to find a dress shirt made out of cotton that is a little looser feeling.

I know it may feel super time consuming trying to find clothes that are similar in feeling for different occasions, but once you are able to find something to help your child be successful and more independent with dressing and have less meltdowns with the dressing process, this can make your family’s life a lot easier.

Strategies

  • Find the texture of clothes that your child prefers and avoid ones that your child really does not like
  • If they need to wear a certain type of fabric they do not like, try having them wear a clothing texture they do like under the clothes so their body does not have to feel the texture they don’t like.
  • If needed, the child can wear clothing inside out so they do not feel the seams.
  • Try warming up the clothes in the dryer before needing to get dressed if your child prefers warm feelings.
  • You may try washing clothes multiple times to make if more soft.
  • Set up the environment for success by setting out the clothes for them or making sure they are easily accessible in their room for them to get dressed more independently.
    • You can also try labeling the dresser drawers or organizing their closet with specific types of clothing in certain areas to make it easier for them to find the different types of clothes.
    • Use hooks or hangers at eye level for the child to be able to visually see all of the items.
  • Provide a visual checklist of each step of dressing to help the child visually see how to get dressed.
  • Provide a rewards chart with stickers for your child to visually see a reward they can work towards with getting dressed independently every day.
  • If your child likes music, try playing music while getting dressed.
  • Make up a silly song about getting dressed and sing it together while your child is getting dressed.
  • Use a mirror to help your child visually see how they are getting dressed.
  • You can model the behavior you want with them when it comes to getting dressed so they can visually see how to put that item of clothing on.
  • Allow for extra time in the morning and night to allow your child to practice each skill and become more independent. That way you don’t feel so rushed. If it is hard to have extra time in the morning, make it a priority to practice the dressed skills at night when you aren’t feeling rushed to leave in the morning.
  • Before getting dressed in the morning or before bed, talk about the dressing process and tell them the exact steps that need to be accomplished so they know the routine.
  • Try calming activities before getting dressed with a massage
  • Complete deep pressure or heavy work activities before getting dressed such as squeezes, jumping on the trampoline, crab walk, or bear crawl.

If your family is still struggling to with dressing, please contact your local occupational therapist and they will be able to provide you with specific strategies for your child and family.

Please let me know if there are certain types of clothes that work well for your child or teenager and I would love to add them to the list to help provide a comprehensive dressing resource for families! Please leave a comment about them below!

Does your child have difficulty learning personal hygiene self care skills? Check out our Ebook Everyday Life Skills Personal Hygiene Skills in the Bathroom for TONS of tips and resources to help your loved one become more independent with these skills!

everyday_life_skills__3D_cover

Are you feeling overwhelmed? Are you looking for Resources to help your family find information about Autism? We have created an amazing FREEBIE with over 180+ Autism and Special Needs Resources just for you!

Autism Free Resources Preview

How to Teach Teenagers with Autism Personal Hygiene Self-Care Tasks

How to Teach Teenagers with Autism Personal Hygiene Self-Care Tasks

Teenagers Autism Personal Hygiene Self Care Tasks

Teaching Personal Hygiene Self-Care Tasks

As you may know our family is working hard to teach my teenage brother with autism to be independent with every day tasks and some of those skills include personal hygiene self care tasks. My mom, really wanted to know where he stood with how much he could do on his own and how much he was needing help from her at home. So, we created these charts with the steps broken down for each task so we could monitor how much assistance he was needing with each skill. Then my mom could learn which steps he was needing the most help with and we could brainstorm ideas on ways he could do those steps more independently.

Here is a sample of 3 of the task analysis charts for you to preview! If you would like to download all for FREE please provide me with your name and email address below! Tasks you will receive: showering, bathing, brushing teeth, washing face, toileting routine for boys, girls, and bowel movement, and brushing hair!

Task Analysis charts for Personal Hygiene Skills

 

For example, he was learning to wash his face every day with a new acne soap to help him with his skin. In the beginning my mom had to do each step for him because he hated to get his face wet with water and he was afraid to get soap in his eyes. One way we helped him with this fear was by having a dry towel within arms reach that he could get to if he felt like he was going to get water or soap in his eyes. This helped to calm him so that he was more willing to complete the task. Then each day my mom would try one simple step for him to try such as getting his hands wet and just touching this face and then gradually working to having him getting this face wet himself. This was a very slow process and we were very patient with him, but over time and with lots of repetition he was able to do this skill pretty much all by himself. Now my mom just stands by and watches incase he needs something and plus this helps with his fear as well.

As a family, we know that these skills can be difficult to learn and take lots of time and repetition to help our children learn to do these skills independently. We also know that there has to be somewhat of an intrinsic motivation for the child to want to be independent with the skill. For my brother, he was motivated to learn these skills to help his skin feel and look better and he had mentioned that he wanted to get married one day 🙂 So we had a conversation about how if you want to get a girlfriend you will want to smell nice for her. These were ideas were intrinsically motivating for him so he was more willing to practice this skill as well.

Think about your families life and dynamic? What is important to your child? Have they mentioned anything about friends or how their body feels? Maybe that could be an idea to go with to help motivate them to learn this skill. Or do they have someone they look up to that could talk to them about the importance of keeping our bodies clean and healthy?

Let me know in the comments below if there are any strategies you have used to help your teenager with autism be more motivated to learn the personal hygiene skills?

Does your child have difficulty learning personal hygiene self care skills? Check out our Ebook Everyday Life Skills Personal Hygiene Skills in the Bathroom for TONS of tips and resources to help your loved one become more independent with these skills!

everyday_life_skills__3D_cover

Are you looking for more Autism Resources? Check out our post with over 180+ Autism and Special Needs Resources to help you feel less overwhelmed! It is an amazing FREE download!!

Autism Free Resources Preview

7 Sensory Processing Books to Help you Understand the Child’s Perspective

7 Sensory Processing Books to Help you Understand the Child’s Perspective

*This post contains affiliate links, there is no extra cost to you, but will greatly help our family. Please see our disclosure statement for further details. 

Sensory Processing Books

7 Sensory Processing Books To help you Understand the Child's Perspective

My family and I wanted to combine a list of various sensory processing books that we have gone to for resources to learn how to best help my brother and the kids that we have worked with. The sensory system and world is very complex and can be difficult to understand when we can’t feel what the other person is feeling or going through. We wanted to learn as much as we could to best be able to help our brother with his day to day activities and to help keep him in a calm state where he can best learn. We have found these books to be excellent resources and we hope you will too!

The Out-of-Sync Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz

 

The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years by Carol Kranowitz and Lucy Jane Miller

 

The Out-of-Sync Child has Fun, Revised Edition: Activities for Kids with Sensory Processing Disorder by Carol Kranowitz

Raising a Sensory Smart Child: the Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Processing Issues, Revised Edition by Lindsey Biel, Nancy Peske & Temple Grandin

Understanding Your Child’s Sensory Signals: A Practical Daily Use Handbook for Parents and Teachers by Angie Voss

The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, Chronically Inflexible Children by Ross W. Greene (this is a behavior book with very good reviews)

Sensational Kids: Hope and Help for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) by Lucy Jane Miller

 

We hope that you have found this list to be helpful for your own learning purposes to best be able to help your loved ones. We want to be here to help you and provide you with support and encouragement. Please let us know which books you have found helpful or if you have another book you would like to add to the list!

Are you feeling overwhelmed with various information about Autism or having a hard time find good resources? This post is part of our FREE resource that we have created with tons of information and Autism and Special Needs Resources! You will be able to find tons of information such as websites, blogs, podcasts, books, support groups, transition to adulthood resources and MORE! If you would like to download this FREE resource please provide your name and email address in the boxes below!

Autism Free Resources Preview

 

Please let us know in the comments below what you think about the resources and if there is anything you are struggling with as a parent with your child with Autism currently? We would love to provide you with resources and encouragement!

Are you looking for more books about Autism and children with disabilities?

Check out our post about 21 Books to Help you Better Understand Autism. and 13 Children’s Books About Disabilities 

Lastly, check out our post on 5 Ways to Better Understand Autism for more information

21 Books to Help you Better Understand Autism

21 Books to Help you Better Understand Autism

*This page contains affiliate links, there is no extra cost to you, but will greatly help our family. Please see our disclosure statement for further details. 

21 Books to Help you Better Understand Autism

21 Books to Help you Better Understand Autism Pin

Our family has read many books over the years to help us better understand Autism and various perspectives to help us better be able to help my brother through his journey through life. We wanted to create a resource with various books that we have found helpful and highly recommended.

The Reason I jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen Year old Boy with Autism by Naoki Higashida

 

The Spark: A Mother’s Story of Nurturing, Genius, and Autism by Kristine Barnett

 

NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity by Steve Silberman

 

Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes you Knew: Updated and Expanded Edition by Ellen Notbohm

 

Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism by Barry M. Prizant

 

In a Different Key: the Story of Autism by John Donvan & Caren Zucker

 

Carly’s Voice: Breaking Through Autism by Arthur & Carly Fleishmann

 

A Parent’s Guide to High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: How to Meet the Challenges and Help your Child Thrive by Sally Ozonoff, Geraldine Dawson, & James C. McPartland

 

The Anti-Romantic Child: A Memoir of Unexpected Joy by Priscilla Gilman

 

Autism Every Day: Over 150 Strategies Lived and Learned by a Professional Autism Consultant with 3 Sons on the Spectrum by Alyson Beytien

 

Somewhere Over the Sea: A Father’s Letter to his Autistic Son by Halfdan W. Freihow

 

The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed by Temple Grandin

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder (revised): The Complete Guide to Understanding Autism by Chantal Sicile-Kira

 

The Obsessive Joy of Autism by Julia Bascom

The Obsessive Joy of Autism

Kids Beyond Limits: The Anat Baniel Method for Awakening the Brain and Transforming the Life of your Child with Special Needs by Anat Baniel

The Social Skills Picture Book: Teaching Play, Emotion, and Communication to Children with Autism by Jed Baker

The Social Skills Picture Book for High School and Beyond by Jed Baker

I See Things Differently: A First Look at Autism by Pat Thomas

It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: An Autism Spectrum Guide to the Confusing World of Idioms, Metaphors, and Everyday Expressions by Michael Barton

Motivate to Communicate!: 300 Games and Activities for your Child with Autism by Simone Griffin

All My Stripes: A Story for Children with Autism by Shaina Rudolph & Danielle Royer

 We wanted to create a comprehensive list that can provide you with a wide variety of options to help you learn more Autism and learn the world through their perspective and eyes. Our family has loved getting to read these books and we hope you will too. Please share with us books that you have enjoyed and if there are any that you feel should be added!

Has your child just received the Autism Diagnosis? Are you feeling overwhelmed with all of the information? We wanted to create a comprehensive FREE resource for you with tons of Autism and Special Needs Resources. This blog post is part of our resource where we provide you with information on tons of areas such as websites, books, podcasts, blogs, support groups, transitions into adulthood and MORE! If you would like this FREE download please provide us with your name and email address below to grab your FREE copy! Autism Free Resources Preview

Please reach out to us if you have any questions or areas that we can help you with! We are here to support you!

13 Children’s Books About Disabilities

13 Children’s Books About Disabilities

*This page contains affiliate links, there is no extra cost to you, but will greatly help our family. Please read our disclosure statement for more information. 

13 Children’s Books About Disabilities 

13 books about disabilities pin

Are you looking for children’s books that provide insight and understanding about various disabilities? I feel that the best way to help our children learn compassion and understanding is by talking to them about various disabilities and sharing stories to help them understand.

We have compiled a round up of various books that we have come across that share insight about children with various disabilities. We have not personally read them all, but they were all highly recommended.

My Brother Sammy is Special by by Becky Edwards

 In this book Sammy has autism and his brother gets frustrated that he can’t always play with him because he doesn’t like the same things he does and wants a brother more like him. But by the end of the book the older brother realizes that he should not demand everything on his own terms and that Sammy’s way of doing things may not be so bad after all. Grades K–3.

Just Because by Rebecca Elliott

 This is a heartwarming picture book about being perfectly loved, no matter what. The younger brother goes on to describe all of the fun he has with his big sister who he loves so much and delights in telling us all about the fun things they do together. As the books goes on he realizes his sister has special needs and he accepts this as he does, all the wonderful things about her. Ages 4-8.

My Brother Charlie by Holly Robinson Peete

In this book,Charlie has autism and it goes on to talk about how his brain works in a special way and it’s harder for him to make friends. His big sister tells us, for everything that Charlie can’t do well, there are plenty more things that he’s good at. She goes on to tell us everything he is good at and shows a wonderful relationship between siblings. Grades  K–3.

Molly the Pony: A True Story by Pam Kaster

This book is about Molly the pony and shares the experiences she went through when she was rescued after Hurrican Katrina and her new ling on a farm with new animal friends. A dog at the farm attacks her and her front leg is injured badly and she undergoes amputation of her front leg which is a rare surgery for horses. She then relearns how to walk and embarks on this new mission in life. Grades K-3.

Knockin’ on Wood: Starring Peg Leg Bates by Lynne Barasch

This is an inspirational biography of Clayton -Peg Leg- Bates (1907-1998), an African American man who over came the hardship of losing a leg at age 12 and went on to become a world-renowned tap dancer. Grades K-3.

Rainbow Joe and Me by Maria Diaz Strom

This book talks about how Eloise learns a new way to see the world through her friend Rainbow Joe who is blind. He teaches her how he imagines and mixes colors. Eloise learns a whole new way to see the world. Grades K-3.

Different, Not Less: A Children’s Book About Autism by Dan Gibbons

This is a fantastic book talking about how children with autism can do amazing, incredible things!  This book can be used to teach your child about Autism Spectrum Disorder. The poem in the book was written by a father of a son with ASD. This book will give you an opportunity to explain the diagnosis to your child when you believe they are able to understand. Each page also has a hidden word. Red letters mixed in with the black letters spell uplifting words for those diagnosed with autism. Can your child find them? Grades K-3.

Silent Star: the Story of Deaf Major Leaguer William Hoy by Bill Wise


This book shares the story of William Hoy and how he loved baseball. Growing up in the 1860s and ’70s, he dreamed of one day playing in the major leagues. A far-off fantasy for many boys, fulfilling this dream was even more of a long shot for William, who was deaf. Age Range: 6 – 11 years.

The Pirate of Kindergarten by George Ella Lyon

This book shares the experiences of a child in kindergarten who has double vision and the strugggles she goes through with double vision. She then starts to wear a patch to help her with her vision and she becomes the pirate of kindergarten. With the help of her patch she is now able to read and cut! Age Range: 4-8 years. 

Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco

This book does a wonderful job of explaining and showing how a teacher can help a child overcome dyslexia and helps her learn to read. This can be a great book for a child that has difficulty reading or for a teacher who has made a difference in a child’s life. Age Range: 5-8 years.

I Can Understand by Aviva M. Cantor


This book was inspired by the relationship of the authors older brother who had disabilities. Whenever children would see her brother they would ask why he looked different and her mother would respond, “He can’t talk, but he can understand.” This inspired her to write a book to help children have a better understanding of people with special needs. Through this book Joey is the narrator and gets the opportunity to speak for himself and the reader gets to learn his perspective.  This book lets others benefit from all that the author’s brother has taught her about acceptance, humanity, and unconditional love. Grades K-3.

Mrs. Gorski, I Think I Have The Wiggle Fidgets by Barbara Esham

This book describes what it is like for kids in class who need to wiggle and move and how they can feel embarrassed by these behaviors. It provides some great techniques to help with these behaviors in the classroom and is very highly recommended. Age Range: 6 and up.

Dana Also Deserves a Playground by Yael Manor

This story aims to shed light, on the discrimination against disabled children in the playgrounds. It provides some of the struggles these children face on the play ground and how we can create a more inclusive play ground. Grades K-3.

We hope this list can provide you with a variety of stores to share with your children to help us provide a world with acceptance and understanding. Do you have a favorite book about disabilities that you would like us to add to this list? Please let us know what stories you like!

Has your child been recently diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and you are feeling overwhelmed? This blog post is part of our FREE Autism & Special Needs Resource PDF where we provide you with a wealth of resources from sites, blogs, podcasts, books, and even transition to adulthood resources. Please enter your name and email below to download our FREE resource.

Autism Free Resources Preview